Womenz Magazine

The Sumerian Culture

The Sumerian Culture

The Sumerian CultureSeated along the Euphrates River, Sumer had a thriving agriculture and trade industry. Herds of sheep and goats and farms of grains and vegetables were held both by the temples and private citizens. Ships plied up and down the river and throughout the Persian Gulf, carrying pottery and various processed goods and bringing back fruits and various raw materials from across the region, including cedars from the Levant.

Sumer was one of the first literate civilizations leaving many records of business transactions, and lessons from schools. They had strong armies, which with their chariots and phalanxes held sway over their less civilized neighbors. Perhaps the most lasting cultural remnants of the Sumerians though, can be found in their religion.

The Sumerian culture includes a lot of interesting things and pottery is one of them. They used to make handmade pottery in the form of dishes and bowls. Vases and dishes were also made for decoration purposes. A feathered head-dress was worn by the Sumerians and it used to be very colorful and even today such head dresses are very fascinating and one wants to have them for Halloween or any other occasion. There used to be fire places and apparently chimneys as well.

They used to use tablets for writing purposes and they used to write on them with either silver or gold the Sumerian writings are one of the earliest forms of writings found on earth. The jewelry and ornaments that they use were made of gold even in those days. The designs were simple but yet very interesting. There is a lot of evidence that the Sumerians loved music and it was a part of their society as well as their religion.

Women were given rights and everything but the Sumerian society was still male dominated. Agriculture and hunting was also very popular among the Sumerians. The Sumerian architecture is also great and archeologists simply love to study it.

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